Letters To Lek

Lek Taylor

Today @ 12:55 pm, Heaven gained their biggest angel…even if she’s only four nine and weighs in at 85 lbs.
Tonight, the heavens shine a lot brighter with their best star in the sky.
Today, my mama, my Crazy Little Thai Woman, the woman who I adored, passed away.
I could go on about what happened, but those who know me and who I hold dear in my life know so there’s no need to repeat. Those who don’t know me, just know the story below. She lives forever in me, in my sister, in my father, in my nieces, and in every breathe that we breath. She is watching down over not only me, my dad, my sister, my nieces, my brother-in-law, but she is watching down over all of us. She will guide you when you are lost. She will answer the questions you have. She will be there for you with a caring ear and a heart as big as the world. Just look up to the sky and find the brightest star and talk. She is there. She will always be there.
Lek Taylor – June 5, 1948 to December 17, 2009
A loving wife, mother, & grandmother. A spirit so beautiful that it will take your breath away. May she shine down on us forever from the heavens. I love you Mama. You gave me 34 wonderful years and I wouldn’t trade them for the world. You & Daddy made me the woman I am today and the woman I will be tomorrow. May I pack as much punch in my life as you did in your own.
Parts of this was originally written: Sat. Sept. 12th
My mom is an amazing woman. She’s four feet & nine inches of all punch. She speaks what is exactly on her mind and if it hurts your feelings, you’ll get over it.  She moved to the US in 1975 after meeting my dad while he was stationed in Thailand. They met fell in love and after only 5 dates & a 6 month separation, they married each other. They had so many obstacles against them when they married.  One being the language barrier. My mom spoke no English and my dad spoke no Thai. They understood each other well enough without language to succeed.  Score one for love knocking down a barrier.  Two being an era when it was frowned upon to marry outside your race. My dad told me the story of how he called his parents to say he was marrying my mom. They said to him never come. He said I guess you’ll never see your grandchildren then. It’s so weird to hear this because my mom and my grandma are very close.  Love brought down another barrier.
Though I felt like a looser moving back home a few years ago, I originally moved back home to take care of their house and their pets since my dad is long haul truck driver, but really it was for my mother. She’s very traditional in her thoughts and didn’t understand the first time I moved out. I wasn’t married. Who would take care of me she often asked.
She mows the grass three times a week via push mower. We have a pretty large front yard, but here is this tiny little Asian woman, pushing a bright yellow lawnmower and sweating like only Southern weather can make you sweat. I have my mom back. The lawnmower pushing, digging in the garden, walking in the woods, crazy Thai woman back. She’s a spitfire and though I know she’s in pain because of her hip, it didn’t stop her from doing what she normally does on a Saturday and that’s spend all of the waking sunlight outdoors with her dogs and digging in her garden.
Listening to “Closer to the Edge” by Thirty Seconds to Mars